Vide-grenier

Every fall, an event is held in my neighborhood that I look forward to with much the same excitement I used to feel when I was little and Christmas was approaching: the vide-grenier. Literally “attic-emptying”, it’s what we in the States call a rummage sale.

Paris is also home to the largest antiques market in Europe, Le Marché aux Puces de Saint-Ouen just north of the city limit. It’s like a gigantic partially outdoor museum of beautiful furnishings and art, and I love to visit it, but it can be a source of frustration in that the prices are often prohibitive. This is where rummage sales become an attractive alternative. But they’re also an excellent way to renew your wardrobe or book collection at low cost while helping maximize the longevity of consumer goods and protesting planned obsolescence. Plus, pretty much everything you find is unique.

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For a small sum, neighborhood residents can sell unneeded items from a space on a street bordering the park or an adjoining street a block away. Like at rummage sales all over in the world, you can find dishes, clothes, books, jigsaw puzzles and Scabble games.

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Everything 60s at this table. I adored the color of the deep turquoise ashtray, but couldn’t convince myself to buying an ashtray.

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Pre-loved mystery novels with yellowing vanilla-scented pages. I love the typeface and simple illustration.

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I quite liked this large oil painting, but don’t have enough wall space at my place. It would be perfectly at home in a cobbler’s shop (of which there are many in Paris).

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Like Proust and his madeleines, one look at an album like this whisks me back in time to my grandparents’ house.

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This table was run by a man and his pre-teen son, who seemed to be liquidating his toy-car collection in preparation for adulthood. I bought the Paris bus (more on that later) but soon noticed that one of the wheels was missing. The boy briefly rummaged around for it at the bottom of a box to no avail, and then, regaining control of the situation, puffed out his chest and instructed his father to refund me 50 cents.

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What seems like a reasonable thing to buy while on vacation often ends up at a rummage sale. Souvenir plates from various European destinations are a mainstay of Parisian sales. Andorra is a common one, for some reason.

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Another item you always find at French rummage sales is ceramic fèves from inside the galette des rois (king cake), which is traditionally eaten at the end of the Christmas season. Whoever gets the piece with the fève hidden inside is the king or queen of the evening, and gets to wear the paper crown supplied with the cake. Some people become serious collectors of fèves, which are often figurines of people in medieval dress but can take other forms. The word fève means bean, as a dry bean was originally the thing hidden inside these cakes when it first came into being some 300 years ago. I picked up two of these for 50 cents each.

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An ingenious telephone-lamp, from the 60s and made in the 60s, as the stand-keeper explained. Both parts work! Somehow I can’t help thinking of Jemaine’s camera-phone on Flight of the Conchords.

So what did I end up taking home?

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One of my best finds this year! A recipe book whose title could be translated Cooking with the Mafia—now that’s something you just can’t refuse. The lady at the stand, recognizing my accent, told me in very good English that her mother was American. She threw in this little cookbook for free. What is American cuisine? Even I am not sure.

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A set of presses for making beautifully shaped turnovers and ravioli. May just come in handy for the Mafia book!

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A set of old metal cannisters for tea, coffee and sugar.

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My personal colletion of fèves, with a 50 euro-cent piece (similar in size to a US quarter) for scale. The pink lady and purple guy in the back row are the new acquisitions.

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The bus! I think this is my favorite among all the things I found. I love that it’s a replica of the real buses of Paris (even bearing the RATP logo), and I find it so charming that a vehicle as decidedly unglamorous as an articulated city bus was manufactured in miniature for children who, one imagines, would normally be more interested in racecars. I also couldn’t resist getting this mini Paris garbage truck for my three-year-old nephew, who has a burning passion for anything on wheels. I often take photos for him of the real thing—much to the amusement of the garbage-truck men, when they catch me—and send them to his mom via Telegram. Actually, I have a feeling he’ll end up with the bus too.

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All aboard for Porte d’Italie!

My neighborhood has its big vide-grenier just once a year, but there are other ones in different parts of the city most weekends. Sometimes they’re devoted to higher-priced antiques, art or stamps, in which case it might be referred to as a brocante. Whether you live here or will only be passing through, you can check out this dedicated site to find upcoming vide-greniers all over France.

One thought on “Vide-grenier

  1. This looks, for me, wonderful!! I mentioned the little figures that are/were hidden in cakes and puddings in my PhD thesis, pointing out the difference between these and the bisque porcelain figures often found in the UK, Germany and North America (and beyond). My brother collects the English equivalent of “feves,” which he identifies as cake-top ornaments. I shall have to come over next autumn to pore over these marvels!

    Liked by 1 person

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